Junior doctors' strike 2019

 

What you need to know about the junior doctors' strike

The Resident Doctors’ Association which represents most Resident Medical Officers – RMOs or doctors in training – has issued notice of a 48 hour strike from 8am on Tuesday 12 February to 8am on Thursday 14 February 2019.

Keeping patients and staff safe during this time is our main priority and contingency planning is well underway to ensure emergency and essential services are available to those who need them.

A strike of this nature will impact on our ability to carry out our normal services at our hospitals. Other members of the wider medical team have responded and stepped up to help minimise the impact on services where possible, but most planned and elective services will have to be deferred and we are contacting all patients involved to reschedule.

We understand this will be an inconvenience to people and we apologise for this. For more information about changes to appointments please call 0800 753 868.

Midwives strike 2019

 

Taranaki DHB’s priority is the safety of women and their babies during the midwives strike

Midwives who are members of the midwifery union MERAS are going on strike for 12 hours from 9am to 9pm Wednesday 13 February. This does not affect Lead Maternity Carers (LMCs) and community midwives, or Hawera Hospital.

Taranaki DHB’s priority is the safety of women and their babies and we have plans in place to ensure women can access the services they need and are kept safe during the strike. The maternity ward will be open and women will still be able to come to Taranaki Base Hospital’s maternity ward as usual. antenatal clinics will still be running. There may be some changes to normal services but we expect these to be minimal and we thank you for your patience. 

For more information please read the Frequently Asked Questions. If you have any concerns please contact your midwife.

Frequently Asked Questions

 

1. What is happening during the strike?

Taranaki DHB is preparing to close many of the services provided due to the impact of the strike.

Other members of the wider medical team have responded and stepped up to help minimise the impact on services where possible. The hospitals will continue to operate essential services such as the Emergency Departments, emergency surgery, ICU, maternity care and all wards throughout the strike, and patient safety remains the DHB’s top priority for patients and staff alike.

Some services provided by Taranaki DHB may close before the date of the strike to ensure the number of patients in hospital is as low as possible, so that care can be provided safely.

We have had to reschedule some of our non-urgent outpatient appointments and mostof our elective surgeries. Patients affected will be contacted directly to advise them if their appointment has had to be rescheduled.

 

2. What if I have a planned surgery, caesarean section or an appointment during the strike?

We will contact you directly to advise you of any changes to your scheduled surgery or appointment. Unless we have contacted you directly to let you know your appointment is being rescheduled, we ask that you come to your scheduled appointment on time. We understand any changes to appointments will be an inconvenience and we apologise for this. Any caesarean that is clinically urgent will not be delayed.

For more information about changes to appointments please call 0800 753 868.

 

3. What happens if I need to go into hospital to give birth or have another procedure and the midwives are on strike?

The majority of pregnant women are cared for by a community midwife or Lead Maternity Carer (LMC) who will not be striking and should be in contact with anyone with a due date during the strike period. If you are in hospital and being cared for by a hospital midwife who is taking part in the strike, you may be cared for by another midwife during this time.

 

4. How many midwives are going on strike?

80% of Taranaki DHB midwives are members of the midwifery union MERAS. This does not affect Lead Maternity Carers (LMCs) or Hawera Hospital.

 

5. How can you be sure that you will have enough midwives to care for me?

We have agreed with the union for midwives to be on site to provide care to women to keep them safe during the hours their colleagues are on strike. We also have more midwives on call if needed.

 

6. What should I do if I have a non-urgent health issue?

Other members of the wider medical team have responded and stepped up to help minimise the impact on services where possible however, we will only have enough staff to manage emergency cases, so we advise you not to come to the hospital emergency department unless you or your family member is acutely unwell.

It’s important if you or your family member have non-urgent health issues that you call Healthline (0800 611 116), visit a pharmacy, or contact your GP, Medicross or Phoenix Urgent Doctors.

Remember GP visits for under 14s are free.

In an emergency you should dial 111 for an ambulance.

 

7. What will happen to people who turn up to ED with a non-urgent health issue?

If you turn up to ED and are not acutely unwell you will be redirected back to your GP or advised to go to Medicross or Phoenix Urgent Doctors.

 

Last updated: Thursday, February 7, 2019

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